James Alex Fields Jr. is the “Terrorist” the Left Have Been Waiting to Vilify

Charlottesville, VA – The left-wing media has descended on this proud Southern city with it’s narrative to vilify James Alex Fields Jr., the man accused of driving his car into left-wing anarchists at a peaceful “Unite the Right” rally that was intended to celebrate southern culture and history, and paint him as a terrorist in the same vein as Timothy McVeigh, the Oklahoma City bomber. The only problem is that it’s not clear he was targeting left-wing anarchists and instead he may have been targeting protesters in general.

Background to the “Unite the Right Rally” 

Whilst there were many flags and banners carried by the “Unite the Right” protesters, not a single weapon is visible.

On Sunday, “Unite the Right” protesters rallied against the proposed removal of Confederate war hero General Robert E. Lee, which was slated for removal. The left-wing media however quickly took the opportunity to characterize the rally as a white nationalist rally. Major mainstream news agencies from the L.A. Times to NBC to the New York Times characterized the rally as either a “white nationalist rally” or “white-power” or “white supremacy.” However nothing could have been further from the truth. According to Christoper Garrett, a retired history school teacher and civil war historian from nearby Waynesboro,

“The rally was never about white supremacy, it was about preserving Southern history and culture.”

“General Lee fought for what he thought was right and even though in this age we may disagree, that doesn’t mean we get to judge him for fighting for what he believed in. That’s un-American.”

“This is about history, it’s never been about white supremacy and the anarchists are just using that as an excuse to rise up.”

The mostly peaceful protest was too attractive a target for liberal antifa groups who have been agitating for months to find a high-profile conservative target. Hundreds of liberal protesters and antifa members were bussed into Charlottesville from other parts of the country to oppose the rally.

Although the rally was scheduled to last five hours, it was over in less than 15 minutes. Police, cleared the park surrounding General Robert E. lee’s statute as soon as the left-wing anarchists starting spoiling for a fight. As the left-wing anarchists were armed and starting to hurl rocks at the peaceful “Unite the Right” protesters, the police quickly led them away before the left-wing anarchists could do any real damage. Just in time as a car plowed into the area where the “Unite the Right” protesters had been standing just moments earlier.

The “Unite the Right” rally quickly descended into chaos as it was unclear who was protesting what when the columns of protesters merged. In this picture you can clearly see the “Unite the Right” protesters mixing in with the left-wing anarchists.

In the confusion, the car, which was alleged to be driven by Fields, was aimed directly at the “Unite the Right” protesters, but instead, as the left-wing anarchists pushed forward, the car hit them instead. Although some conservative protesters were injured, the left-wing anarchists took the brunt of the collision.

One person, 32-year old Heather Hayer, a paralegal with the Miller Law Group who was crossing the street to confront “Unite the Right” protesters was struck down by the car and 19 others who were with her were hit as well. According to one eyewitness, Alexa Jones who was an onlooker,

“The police cleared the [“Unite the Right”] protesters just minutes before we heard a really loud roar of an engine and screeching of tires.”

“The next thing we see a gray car go straight into the other side (the left-wing anarchists), but you could see the surprise on the driver’s face. Like as if he realized he had done something he didn’t want to.”

Who is James Alex Fields, Jr.? 

The man suspected of plowing into a street full of protestors in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday has been identified as James Alex Fields, Jr. of Maumee, Ohio, The New York Times reports. Fields, 20, has been charged with second-degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding, and failure to stop at the scene of a fatal accident for his alleged involvement in the incident, which resulted in the death of an as-yet-unidentified 32-year-old woman.

The 2010 Dodge Challenger that is alleged to have crashed into protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Fields was alleged to have been driving a 2010 Dodge Challenger into a throng of protesters and counter-protesters and was registered to him at the same time. The car has not been reported as stolen. Fields has no previous criminal history and lived in Maumee, Ohio, about 15 miles southwest of Toledo. Fields was a registered Republican and registered to vote in Lucas County, Ohio, according to public records.

RELATED: WHEN DID OUR HISTORY BECOME NOT WORTH REMEMBERING? 

In an interview with Fields’s mother, Samantha Bloom, she said that Fields had texted her on Friday saying he dropped his cat off at her apartment and was going to an “alt-right” rally in Virginia.

According to Bloom, she told her son,

“I told him to be careful. [And] if they’re going to rally to make sure he’s doing it peacefully.”

Blooms said he didn’t say anything about the rally possibly being extremist and she had no idea he was involved when she returned home from dinner on Saturday night. She really didn’t know what the alt-right rally meant, only to think that it had “something” to do with President Trump adding,

“Trump’s not a white supremacist.”

According to Bloom, Fields had moved out of her apartment about five or six months ago, after they moved to northwest Ohio from Kentucky for her job.

One of Fields’s uncles, who spoke on condition of anonymity told The Washington Post that Fields’s mom had raised Fields alone as a single mom after his dad died adding that she’s a paraplegic.

Fields’s father was killed by a drunk driver just a few months after he was born, an uncle told The Washington Post. His father left Fields money that his uncle had kept in a trust until Fields was 18 and according to the uncle,

“When he turned 18, he demanded his money, and that was the last I had any contact with him.”

The uncle said that Fields was quiet and reserved and generally kept to himself, but added that there was no reason to believe he had any violent tendencies.

A photo of Fields with the Vanguard of America allegedly taken at the Charlottesville rally has also surfaced.

However, there is no way to verify when this photo was taken and whether or not it was taken at Charlottesville to begin with and if it was, how could Fields have been driving the car as well as taking part in the rally at the same time?

What really happened at Charlottesville? 

The “Unite the Right” rally was never intended to be violent, rather it was a gathering of like-minded individuals to preserve the rapidly eroding history of the south. Love him or hate him, General Robert E. Lee is still a war hero to many southerners. He may have made some flawed choices in today’s context, but given the tumultuous period he lived in, he made his decisions on the best information that was available to him at the time and more importantly, he stood by his choices.

The “Unite the Right” protesters were carrying tiki torches and as is clear from this picture, were unarmed and singing songs.

After close to a decade under former president Barrack Obama, the left have taken the opportunity to hijack American history and undermine the remaining symbols of southern pride, confederate memorials and statues.

At the time the car that was alleged to have been driven by Fields hit protesters, there was no way for anyone to know whether Fields was targeting “Unite the Right” protesters or the left-wing anarchists. In the photo below, you can clearly see “Unite the Right” protesters mixing in with left-wing anarchists. On the left side you can see a “Unite the Right” protester with his black flag and two others standing and facing the oncoming vehicle on the right.

As is clear from the picture above, “Unite the Right” protesters are standing among counter-protesters and stand their ground against the speeding car, protecting other protesters behind them.

In fact, evidence is beginning to surface that the Fields may have had a dispute with the “Unite the Right” protesters claiming that they were not “focusing on the white supremacy movement” but instead “focusing on the historical significance of the confederate monuments.”

According to a civil war historian who is familiar with Fields and Vanguard America and who wished to remain anonymous,

“Fields wanted the protest to be about “white supremacy” but the organizers were quick to downplay the “white supremacy” element and were more keen to play on the historical significance of the confederate memorials.”

“There was a growing sense of frustration that the rally which Fields had driven all the way from Ohio to attend was not turning out to be the white nationalist rally he was hoping for.”

According to another “Unite the Right” protester who knew Fields from Vanguard America and asked not to be named,

“I ran into Fields about half an hour before the car accident and he was saying that he was going to leave because he was ‘sick and tired of watching the antifa push us around’ and that we (“Unite the right”) were not doing anything about it.”

“I asked him to stay, but he said that we could all go f*ck ourselves.”

There is growing evidence that Fields may not have been targeting the counter-protesters but rather the protest in general.

In the chaos, both “Unite the Right” protesters and counter-protesters were hit by the car.

If you look carefully at the image above, you can see the black flag of Vanguard America in the top left hand corner as well as the banners of other groups. In other words, there was no way to tell if Fields was targeting any particular group of protesters.

With Fields now in custody, his motivation for crashing his car into his protesters will likely be clearer in the coming days. However, the immediate evidence strongly suggests that Fields was not targeting left-wing anarchists despite what the left-wing media might suggest. The distinction is important because it can help to avoid further bloodshed instigated by increasing left-wing militancy and their pliant liberal media.

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